Taeniolabis taoensis

- Name means "ribbon lips"

  • Age: First appeared 720,000 years after the K-T extinction. 
  • Size: 34-56 kg; comparable to a small capybara
  • Belongs to an extinct group of mammals called “multituberculates,” arguably the most successful group of mammals that were around for over 150 million years. 
  • Fun facts: We hypothesize that they likely ate legumes and were river dwelling creatures. It was the largest multituberculate to ever live. 

Photogrametry models by Shellie Luallin.

Carsioptychus coarctatus

— Named after the oblique folds found on the teeth

  • Age: First appeared 300,000 years after the K-T extinction. 
  • Size: ~30-47 kg  
  • One of the earliest relatives of living hoofed mammals (deer, cows, elephants, horses, etc.).  
  • Fun facts: This species represents the second major jump in body size, from 0.5 kg mammals that survived the K-T extinction, to ~6 kg mammals found ~100,000 years later, to Carsioptychus (~30kg), tipping the scales and 30 kg. Teeth suggest it was a hard object feeder (e.g. nuts); represents the first specialization in diet (from omnivore to herbivore) after the K-T extinction. 

Photogrametry models by Shellie Luallin.

Eoconodon coryphaeus

  • Age: First appeared 680,000 years after the K-T extinction. 
  • Size: ~47-77 kg, about the size of a wolf.  
  • One of the earliest relatives of living hoofed mammals (deer, cows, elephants, horses, etc.).  
  • Fun fact: It has a large hole above its teeth, suggesting a large nerve, which means it had a very sensitive snout (and likely had long, dense whiskers (vibrissae) for sensing its surroundings).

Photogrametry models by Shellie Luallin.

Loxolophus sp.

  • Age: First appeared 300,000 years after the K-T extinction. 
  • Size: ~4-6 kg, about the size of a raccoon. 
  • One of the earliest relatives of living hoofed mammals (deer, cows, elephants, horses, etc.).  
  • Fun fact: Likely belongs to a new species of extinct mammal. 

Photogrametry models by Shellie Luallin.